About

AdrianWithSculptureAdrian Arleo is a ceramic sculptor living outside Missoula, Montana. She studied Art and Anthropology at Pitzer College (B.A. 1983) and received her M.F.A. in ceramics from Rhode Island School of Design in 1986. Arleo was an Artist in Residence at Oregon College of Art and Craft in 1986-87, and at Sitka Center For Art and Ecology in 1987-88. For nearly thirty years, Arleo has focused her work on the human figure, often combining it with animal imagery, and other elements of the natural world. Some works allude to a relationship of understanding or connection between the human and animal realms. In others, human figures possess animal features in a way that reveals something hidden about the character or primal nature of the human.

 

For me, every sculpture—even those in a related series—has its own individual, freestanding life. But when I finished this most recent body of work and looked for a feeling that encompassed it as a whole, I was struck by the concept of a harbinger: a dream, sign, or omen foreshadowing things to come. There is a quiet resistance, in this work, to the cultural and biological losses of our time. Some of the pieces reference the feeling of ancient Greek and Italian art; classical imagery has always provided an innate vocabulary. By focussing on older, more mysterious ways of seeing the world, edges of consciousness and deeper levels of awareness suggest themselves.

Adrian Arleo

Arleo’s work is exhibited nationally and internationally, and is in numerous public and private collections, including The World Ceramic Exposition Foundation, Icheon, Korea; The Museum of Arts and Sciences, Macon, Georgia; Yellowstone Art Museum, Billings, MT; Greenwich House Pottery, NY, NY; and Microsoft, Seattle, WA.  Arleo received awards from the Virginia A. Groot Foundation  in 1991 and 1992, and in 1995, she was awarded a Montana Arts Council Individual Fellowship. Some recent publications include: Montana Quarterly, article by Charles Finn, vol. 8, #4, 2012; Ceramics: Art and Perception | Technical, review by Matthew Kangas, issue #88, 2012; Ceramics Monthly Magazine, Working Sculptor Feature, Jan. 2010; and the book The Figure in Clay: Contemporary Sculpting Techniques by Master Artists, published by Lark Books, 2005.

The photographs of her work from 1994 – 2012 were taken by Chris Autio.